What does stuffed up mean in Australia?

(UK, Australia) To make a big mistake. The reason we lost the match is due to the goalkeeper stuffing up. verb.

What does get stuffed mean in Australia?

For example, the phrase “I’m stuffed” has at least three different meanings – “I’m tired,” “I’m in trouble” or “I’m full”.

What does stuffed up mean?

(slang) To ruin or harm. … (slang, Britain, Australia) To make a big mistake. We lost the match because of the goalkeeper stuffing up. To cause (the nasal passages) to be blocked. My nose is all stuffed up so I’m speaking funny.

What are Australian slang words?

100 Australian Slang Words & Phrases

Aussie slang word/phrase Meaning
Bloody oath Yes! Or “That’s very true”
Bludger Someone who’s lazy
Bogan Someone who’s not very sophisticated
Booze Bus Police vehicle used to catch drunk drivers

What are common Australian phrases?

Australian slang: 33 phrases to help you talk like an Aussie

  • Wrap your laughing gear ’round that.
  • Dog’s breakfast. …
  • Tell him he’s dreaming. …
  • A few stubbies short of a six-pack. …
  • What’s the John Dory? …
  • Have a Captain Cook. …
  • No worries, mate, she’ll be right. …
  • Fair go, mate. Fair suck of the sauce bottle. …
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18 дек. 2017 г.

How do Aussies say hello?

The average Australian greets with a simple Hey/Hello/Hi. Avoid saying “G’day” or “G’day mate” when first meeting someone as this can sound strange or patronising coming from a foreigner. Many Australians greet by saying “Hey, how are you?”.

How do you say sorry in Australian?

2 syllables: “SORR” + “ee”

Here are 4 tips that should help you perfect your pronunciation of ‘sorry’:

  1. Break ‘sorry’ down into sounds: [SORR] + [EE] – say it out loud and exaggerate the sounds until you can consistently produce them.
  2. Record yourself saying ‘sorry’ in full sentences, then watch yourself and listen.

What is Australian slang for girl?

It’s usually Sheila I believe – it’s just a girl’s name which, for some reason, has come to be used to denote all females there.

What does stuffed mean?

stuffed Add to list Share. If something is stuffed, it’s packed full of material, like the giant stuffed rabbit you won at the country fair. If a person is stuffed, she’s had too much to eat.

What is meaning of stuffy nose?

Stuffy nose: : The presence of increased secretions and mucus in the nasal passages, most commonly arising as a result of a common cold, allergic reaction, or inflammation or infection of the paranasal sinuses (sinus infection).

What does Crikey mean in Australia?

Another is a word used commonly by the late Steve Irwin, “crikey,” which is Australian slang for “oh my god”. This type of slang is one of the more difficult types to understand for those outside of Australia as many might not understand the context or even what some of the words used mean.

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What is the most Australian word?

The 25 most common Australian slang words

  • See ya this arvo – See you this afternoon.
  • Being dacked – When someone pulls your pants down.
  • Give a wedgie – When someone pulls your pants up your bum.
  • Dunny – toilet, bathroom – D’ya know where the dunny is, mate?
  • Earbashing – constant talking – She gave me an earbashing for coming home at 2am.

12 дек. 2018 г.

What is Australian slang for excellent?

Phrases Slang

PHRASES
Ace! : Excellent! Very good!
Dingo’s breakfast : no breakfast
Dinkum / fair dinkum : true, real, genuine
Dinky-di : the real thing, genuine

How do Aussies say happy birthday?

Australians are no less than the English people. Hey do not have any special language or term for wishing birthdays. All they do is they wish the birthday by uttering the golden words ‘Happy Birthday’.

How do you say thank you in Australian?

“Cheers, mate” is the same as the English word, Thank You, while “No worries” or No drama” translates to “You’re welcome” in Australian slang. If you notice, the word “mate” is often used.

How do you say no in Australian?

Nah. Long sound that rhymes with car. Means negative response or disagreement over matter of opinion used informally but in more formal speech we still say “no”. As in “Nah mate, can’t agree with you.”

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