Who discovered parts of Australia and New Zealand?

Abel Tasman in two distinct voyages in the period 1642–1644 is recorded as the first person to have coastally explored regions of the respective landforms including Van Diemen’s Land – later named for him as the Australian state of Tasmania.

Who discovered Australia and NZ?

Abel Tasman was a great explorer who discovered Australia and New Zealand long before James Cook. Discover what he did in his Australasian Adventures.

Who discovered parts of Australia?

While Indigenous Australians have inhabited the continent for tens of thousands of years, and traded with nearby islanders, the first documented landing on Australia by a European was in 1606. The Dutch explorer Willem Janszoon landed on the western side of Cape York Peninsula and charted about 300 km of coastline.

Was New Zealand originally part of Australia?

New Zealand. … New Zealand was one of the colonies asked to join in the creation of the Commonwealth of Australia, even by the time the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 (Imp) was enacted, that law still provided for New Zealand to be one of the potential states of Australia.

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Who first discovered the land known as New Zealand?

Under the leadership of British statesman Edward G. Wakefield, the first British colonists to New Zealand arrive at Port Nicholson on Auckland Island. In 1642, Dutch navigator Abel Tasman became the first European to discover the South Pacific island group that later became known as New Zealand.

Is Australia still a British colony?

Australia is not directly under British rule, but it is nominally under British rule. … Australia governs itself through its prime minister and its Governor General, but the Queen of Great Britain, Queen Elizabeth the 2nd, is still the monarch of Australia, though she doesn’t directly rule it.

How did Australia get its name?

The name Australia (pronounced /əˈstreɪliə/ in Australian English) is derived from the Latin australis, meaning “southern”, and specifically from the hypothetical Terra Australis postulated in pre-modern geography.

Who named Australia?

It was the English explorer Matthew Flinders who made the suggestion of the name we use today. He was the first to circumnavigate the continent in 1803, and used the name ‘Australia’ to describe the continent on a hand drawn map in 1804. The National Library holds a reproduction.

How old is Australia today?

118 years. But it depends on how you look at it. Australia became a nation on January 1st 1901 when the Australian constitution came into force (188 years ago as of 1/1/2019). Humans first colonised the land mass we now call Australia some 60–70,000 years ago, possibly earlier.

How old is Australia?

Australia began its journey across the surface of the Earth as an isolated continent between about 55 and 10 million years ago, and continues to move north by about seven centimetres each year.

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Can you see New Zealand from Australia?

There’s no point in Australia where you can see New Zealand. At their closest point – Australia and New Zealand are 1,700 km apart. … You also cannot see Tasmania from the East Coast of Australia because Tasmania is to the South of Australia – not the East.

Is it cheaper to live in NZ or Australia?

New Zealand has a lower cost of living than Australia. You’ll likely pay less for everything there. The cost of living in each country is an average set of data. It varies from city to city.

What is the relationship between New Zealand and Australia?

Bilateral relations. Australia and New Zealand are natural allies with a strong trans-Tasman sense of family. Migration, trade and defence ties, keen competition on the sporting field, and strong people-to-people links have helped shape a close and co-operative relationship.

Is New Zealand still a British colony?

New Zealand officially became a separate colony within the British Empire, severing its link to New South Wales.

How did Auckland get its name?

After a British colony was established in 1840, William Hobson, then Lieutenant-Governor of New Zealand, chose the area as his new capital. He named the area for George Eden, Earl of Auckland, British First Lord of the Admiralty. Māori–European conflict over land in the region led to war in the mid-19th century.

Did the Chinese discover New Zealand First?

An amateur English historian believes that Chinese discovered New Zealand well before Maori or Dutchmen.

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