Quick Answer: How do you respond to thank you in Australia?

1. “No worries” If you say ‘thank you’ to an Australian or you show your appreciation for something they’ve done for you, this is often the reply you’ll hear. “You’re welcome” is still said, but it sounds American, even to me!

What to say when someone says thank you in Australia?

“Cheers, mate” is the same as the English word, Thank You, while “No worries” or No drama” translates to “You’re welcome” in Australian slang. If you notice, the word “mate” is often used.

What is the best reply if someone says thank you?

10 English Phrases for Responding to “Thank You”

  • You’re welcome.
  • No problem.
  • No worries.
  • Don’t mention it.
  • My pleasure.
  • Anytime.
  • It was the least I could do.
  • Glad to help.

What do we say in reply of thanks?

The best option is still “you’re welcome”, and Wiktionary defines it as: 1907 (as reply to “thank you”). If you’re not satisfied, there is the alternative of “My pleasure”, which is my personal favourite.

IT IS INTERESTING:  What can't be mailed to Australia?

What is thank you in Australia?

“Ta” definitely means “thank you”, it is common in Australia. People say “ta” to everyone and the phrase usually sounds like “Thank you, ta”. :))))

How do you say sorry in Australian?

Here are 4 tips that should help you perfect your pronunciation of ‘sorry’: Break ‘sorry’ down into sounds: [SORR] + [EE] – say it out loud and exaggerate the sounds until you can consistently produce them.

How do you say goodbye in Australian slang?

The Australian slang for goodbye is Hooroo and sometimes they even Cheerio like British people.

How do you say thank you without sounding cheesy?

Below are seven tactful ways to show gratitude at work without coming off as cheesy or fake, because it’s important to give thanks where it’s due.

  1. Be Blunt — Like, Really Blunt. …
  2. Make Sure It Doesn’t Look Like You Have An Ulterior Motive. …
  3. Mention Them Casually In A Group Setting. …
  4. Tailor It To The Person You’re Thanking.

21 дек. 2015 г.

What is the answer of my pleasure?

Answer. “My pleasure” is an idiomatic response to “Thank you.” It is similar to “You’re welcome,” but more polite and more emphatic. Use it in formal conversation when someone thanks you for doing a favor, and you want to respond in a way that tells them that you were very happy to help and that you enjoyed it.

What can I say instead of my pleasure?

my pleasure

  • forget it.
  • it’s nothing.
  • no problem.
  • no worries.
  • not at all.
  • you are welcome.
IT IS INTERESTING:  Has Australia ever had a white Christmas?

How do you reply to a beautiful comment?

If you want to respond in a simple way and thank your date or partner for the compliment, you can say:

  1. “Thanks so much – I really appreciate you saying that.”
  2. “Thank you – that was really sweet to say.”
  3. “Wow, thanks so much.”
  4. “Thanks – that means a lot.”

Can you reply of course to thank you?

I take ‘of course’ to mean ‘Of course I was happy to help, because you are my friend!’ ‘Sure’ is basically just an acknowledgement of the thanks. If you need help, you know you can ask me anytime, and I will be there for you. You could say anything from ‘tickety-boo’ to ‘I appreciate that’ and get your point across.

How do you say thank you too?

If both you and the other person have mutually done something nice for one another, then “Thank you too” is good. If you alone have done the favour, then “You’re welcome” is better.

Why do Australians say mate?

In Australia, a ‘mate’ is more than just a friend and is a term that implies a sense of shared experience, mutual respect and unconditional assistance.

How do you say hello in Australian language?

The average Australian greets with a simple Hey/Hello/Hi. Avoid saying “G’day” or “G’day mate” when first meeting someone as this can sound strange or patronising coming from a foreigner. Many Australians greet by saying “Hey, how are you?”.

How do you say no in Australian?

Nah. Long sound that rhymes with car. Means negative response or disagreement over matter of opinion used informally but in more formal speech we still say “no”. As in “Nah mate, can’t agree with you.”

IT IS INTERESTING:  What vaccinations do I need to travel to Australia?
Going to Sydney