What was the segregation policy in Australia?

Segregation and merging. By about 1890 the Aborigines’ Protection Board had developed a policy to remove children of mixed descent from their families to be `merged’ into the non-Indigenous population.

What was the protection policy in Australia?

In the name of ‘protection’, Indigenous Australians were made wards of the state and subjected to policies that gave government the power to determine where Indigenous people could live, who they could marry, and where they could work.

What was the integration policy Australia?

During the period 1962–72 integration replaced assimilation as official government policy in dealing with migrants in Australia. Migrants were now encouraged to incorporate themselves into the dominant Anglo-Celtic society but also to retain elements of their own culture.

What were the policies of the Stolen Generation?

It proposed that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be allowed to “die out” through a process of natural elimination, or, where possible, assimilated into the white community. Policies focused on assimilating children as they were considered more adaptable to white society than adults.

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What were the policies of the Aboriginal Protection Board?

The Board had the power to: move Aboriginal people out of towns; set up managers, local committees and local guardians (police) for the reserves; control reserves; prevent liquor being sold to Aboriginals; and to stop whites from associating with Aboriginals or entering the reserves.

How long did the stolen generation last?

The Stolen Generations refer to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who were removed from their families by Australian Federal and State government agencies and church missions between 1910 and 1970 through a policy of assimilation.

When was segregation introduced and terminated in Australia?

In Western Australia, the segregation reinforced by the 1936 Native Administration Act and the racist attitudes of non-Aboriginal people “established an apartheid regime where Aboriginal people in Western Australia were discriminated against in all sorts of ways”.

Why did assimilation fail in Australia?

Contradictory logic. Assimilation, including child removal policies, failed its aim of improving the life of Indigenous Australians. … This essential belief in the inferiority of Indigenous people and their culture undermined the objectives of assimilation policy and led to its failure.

What was the stolen generation policy called?

In 1915, in New South Wales, the Aborigines Protection Amending Act 1915 gave the Aborigines’ Protection Board authority to remove Aboriginal children “without having to establish in court that they were neglected.” At the time, some members of Parliament objected to the NSW amendment; one member stated it enabled the …

How did the child Endowment Act affect aboriginal?

The Child Endowment Act 1941 provided that a sum of 5 shillings per week, for each child after the first under the age of 16 years, be paid directly to the mother. … The act was amended in 1942, and child endowment payments were made available to government-run institutions, and to Aboriginal children living on missions.

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Who ended the Stolen Generation?

The NSW Aborigines Protection Board loses its power to remove Indigenous children. The Board is renamed the Aborigines Welfare Board and is finally abolished in 1969. By 1969, all states have repealed the legislation allowing for the removal of Aboriginal children under the policy of ‘protection’.

Why did Kevin Rudd say sorry?

On 13 February 2008, then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd moved a motion of Apology to Indigenous Australians. His apology was a formal apology on behalf of the successive parliaments and governments whose policies and laws “inflicted profound grief, suffering and loss on these our fellow Australians”.

When did Aboriginal child removal stop?

1940. The NSW Aborigines Protection Board loses its power to remove Indigenous children. The Board is renamed the Aborigines Welfare Board and is finally abolished in 1969. A history of Aboriginal child welfare in NSW: http://www.records.nsw.gov.au/state-archives/guides-and-finding-aids/ar…

What was the aim of the Aboriginal Protection Act?

Aborigines Protection Act 1909

This Act gave the Board for the Protection of Aborigines statutory powers in relation to all reserves. Duty of the Board to provide for the custody, maintenance and education of the children of `aborigines’.

What is the segregation policy aboriginal?

Segregation and merging. By about 1890 the Aborigines’ Protection Board had developed a policy to remove children of mixed descent from their families to be `merged’ into the non-Indigenous population. … It also allowed the Board to apprentice Aboriginal children aged between 14 and 18 years.

What was the purpose of the Aboriginal Protection Act?

The Act outlined the duties of the Protection Board, gave it the right to control Aboriginal reserves and to appoint staff. It also provided the foundation for the Board’s policies of removing youths from Aboriginal stations and setting them to work.

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